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Author Topic: Butterfly bushes?  (Read 3090 times)
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Tina
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« on: September 22, 2015, 01:22:21 PM »

Where can I find butterfly bushes for fall planting?
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natvrabit
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« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2015, 01:42:19 PM »

Get Rooted Nursery in N. Chatham~2038 Crawford Dairy road had some while back. 919.357.3703.
They have some really unusual, cool other things you won't find elsewhere also and more Japanese Maple varieties than one can imagine!
Open to public Fri.-Sun. seasonal and by appt. otherwise. Check 'em out, support an independent Chatham Biz!
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chathamgardener
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« Reply #2 on: September 23, 2015, 04:27:18 PM »

Almost in Chatham County, but technically in Orange is Niche Gardens (http://www.nichegardens.com). I was there today and noticed a number of different varieties for sale.

If your soils are sandy, this non-native has shown some invasive tendencies via abundant seed dispersal. Also note that the wood has been known to cause skin reactions in sensitive people. Because of that, it should never be burned. I know of someone who developed a severe respiratory reaction when he burned some butterfly bush wood in his fireplace.

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natvrabit
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« Reply #3 on: September 24, 2015, 05:31:49 PM »

Yep, it is a non-native, but I've never found it to be an invasive. Maybe that it because I trim blooms off before as they expire and not too much sandy soil around here in this dead pan clay...anyway~
Sorry your friend developed issue from burning said in his fireplace, but really WHY would one think such clippings outside of traditional dried firewood should be used??
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chathamgardener
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« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2015, 06:57:08 AM »

I agree that diligent dead-heading solves the issue. My five acres is sandy loam, native, so it does occur in Chatham county. Smiley  As for the person who burned the wood, he was someone who called in to the plant help desk at the NC Botanical Garden on a day I was working a volunteer shift there -- not a friend. I don't even know his name.

But he was clearing out some big old butterfly bushes -- they can grow quite large if left to their own devices -- and he was trying to be thrifty and use the wood. His allergic reaction was so severe that he called to ask, and when I researched the issue, I learned this is a known trait of this plant. In some people, even handling the bush can create skin rashes, especially in sunlight. The chemicals that cause that reaction are volatilized by burning the wood, and if sensitive people inhale the smoke, the rash basically develops on the inside. Yikes!

The same thing, of course, happens with poison ivy, which is why no one should EVER EVER burn poison ivy, even if the vines appear to be dead. One of my forestry school professors almost died from inhaling poison ivy smoke when he was a young man.

But on to a happier topic -- How about this magnificent rain?!    Cheesy Cheesy
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natvrabit
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« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2015, 12:02:27 PM »

I agree that diligent dead-heading solves the issue. My five acres is sandy loam, native, so it does occur in Chatham county. Smiley  As for the person who burned the wood, he was someone who called in to the plant help desk at the NC Botanical Garden on a day I was working a volunteer shift there -- not a friend. I don't even know his name.

But he was clearing out some big old butterfly bushes -- they can grow quite large if left to their own devices -- and he was trying to be thrifty and use the wood. His allergic reaction was so severe that he called to ask, and when I researched the issue, I learned this is a known trait of this plant. In some people, even handling the bush can create skin rashes, especially in sunlight. The chemicals that cause that reaction are volatilized by burning the wood, and if sensitive people inhale the smoke, the rash basically develops on the inside. Yikes!

The same thing, of course, happens with poison ivy, which is why no one should EVER EVER burn poison ivy, even if the vines appear to be dead. One of my forestry school professors almost died from inhaling poison ivy smoke when he was a young man.

But on to a happier topic -- How about this magnificent rain?!    Cheesy Cheesy

Yes, this is badly needed magnificent rainfall!

Goodness NO, never burn poison ivy! A neighbor did once and landed in hospital. I advised her not to do so, yet she still did as she thought was okay because was outdoors~NOT!

A variety of plants make me itchy~azaleas, junipers etc.

Perhaps my diligent dead heading prevented any seeding over/volunteers. For a similar look, I think Vitex is beautiful, not as much a butterfly attractor tho'!
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chathamgardener
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« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2015, 12:14:43 PM »

The non-native shrub in my yard that attracts more butterflies than any butterfly bush I've ever seen is Chinese Abelia (Abelia chinensis). This shrub can be pruned to whatever size you want. My unpruned one is now -- no exaggeration -- about 8 feet tall and equally wide. Unlike the little abelias that folks use for hedges around here, the Chinese Abelia produces big clusters of flowers. Each flower is white and very sweetly scented. In a good butterfly year, I've counted well over 30 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies visiting the blooming shrub at one time. It is spectacular, and blooms in my yard for about 2.5 months.

I wrote about mine here: http://piedmontgardener.com/2011/07/30/guaranteed-butterflies-with-chinese-abelia/
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noway2
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« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2015, 03:32:54 PM »

The same thing, of course, happens with poison ivy, which is why no one should EVER EVER burn poison ivy, even if the vines appear to be dead. One of my forestry school professors almost died from inhaling poison ivy smoke when he was a young man.
I've heard that a good way to get rid of poison ivy, and this would probably work for other things as well, is to take a pill bottle or similar small container, poke a hole in the lid and fill it with round up.  Then snip off a portion of the vine and stick it in the bottle with round up.  The plant will wick the chemical down to the root and kill it.
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natvrabit
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« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2015, 04:15:31 PM »

The non-native shrub in my yard that attracts more butterflies than any butterfly bush I've ever seen is Chinese Abelia (Abelia chinensis). This shrub can be pruned to whatever size you want. My unpruned one is now -- no exaggeration -- about 8 feet tall and equally wide. Unlike the little abelias that folks use for hedges around here, the Chinese Abelia produces big clusters of flowers. Each flower is white and very sweetly scented. In a good butterfly year, I've counted well over 30 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail butterflies visiting the blooming shrub at one time. It is spectacular, and blooms in my yard for about 2.5 months.

I wrote about mine here: http://piedmontgardener.com/2011/07/30/guaranteed-butterflies-with-chinese-abelia/


My Tardiva hydrangea also gives butterflies much enjoyment when it is showing off! Have seen it just covered in winged beauties! A sight to behold Smiley My cats love to watch them flitting by their look out window and door too.

Again, what a wonderful gentle rain ALL day!  
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natvrabit
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« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2015, 04:22:40 PM »

The same thing, of course, happens with poison ivy, which is why no one should EVER EVER burn poison ivy, even if the vines appear to be dead. One of my forestry school professors almost died from inhaling poison ivy smoke when he was a young man.
I've heard that a good way to get rid of poison ivy, and this would probably work for other things as well, is to take a pill bottle or similar small container, poke a hole in the lid and fill it with round up.  Then snip off a portion of the vine and stick it in the bottle with round up.  The plant will wick the chemical down to the root and kill it.


NoWay I think that quote should be attributed to ChathamGardner, but I DO agree should never burn poison ivy, least suffer severe consequences!
I have upon discovering a sprout of p.i. dabbed leaves with a paint brush with something to take it down to roots. Do my best to keep as much as can from any kind of soil soak.
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